Measuring social media success

•May 4, 2012 • Leave a Comment

This week I attended The Internet Show in Melbourne and presented at Social Media World on Measuring Social Media Success.

My presentation went through a few subjects close to my heart; firstly that thanks to the wealth of information provided by data merchants Facebook and Google, we find ourselves with an overload of data. It’s up to us to be critical about how (and even if) we use that data and putting some context behind the numbers.

I also talked about using the data to fuel adaptive marketing instead of the “set and forget” mentality. With real-time analytics (and let’s face it, even with a 48-72 hour delay) we can use insights to run better creative, test calls to action and, as Jesse Desjardins shared in his talk on Tourism Australia’s approach to advocacy, can even hint at which imagery will provoke the best response from your audience.

I talked about looking outside of the product category when looking to benchmark success. Tactics vary from company to company and it may be worth comparing your activity to a brand with a similar social objective as well as the standard competitor analysis.

One of my big pain points at the moment is the confusion of tactical objectives and strategic objectives. A good performing Facebook page is important to achieve a good Edgerank, the algorithm that determines the priority and frequency of your updates to your fans in their news feed. This has given false importance to “like-baiting”; fluffy messages of “Happy Friday!” and discussions about the weekend are getting interactions that are being measured with equal importance as key brand or campaign messaging. If you feel you need to like-bait to maintain a good page, at least have the decency to report on the effectiveness of actual marketing messages separately.

You can view my presentation here or if you view it on Slideshare you can check out the notes that accompany each slide for some more context.

 

Let me know your thoughts!

Facebook launches new products

•March 1, 2012 • Leave a Comment

This morning Facebook launched Timeline for Pages and a few new products. Here’s an overview.

 5 key takeaways

  • Brand timelines will have messages between fans and the Page (one way only, fan to Page)
  • Ads in news feed will be on mobile
  • You can buy a distribution option and reach more of your fans by being “sticky”
  • Community management, content seeding and ads will be more closely tied together
  • Tests on new premium ads are getting 5-10 x the CTR

Reach generator

A paid distribution option. Currently each update reaches approx. 16% of fans (completely contradicts current impression stats but let’s forget about that for now). If you use the Reach Generator product you’ll be reaching 50-70% of your fans. Case study given was Ben & Jerry’s – reaching 98% of fans, doubled engagement, increased sales x3.

Premium on Facebook

Ads were good. Stories are better.

Premium on Facebook evolves Facebook advertising. Everything starts with the Page. You post an update on the Page (text, link, photo, video, offers) and you can then seed this story out to your followers and a wider audience. The ads can then be displayed in 5 areas:

  • Page post
  • Right hand side
  • News feed
  • Mobile news feed
  • Logout screen

This will need to be the same creative (story) for all placements.

105m people log out of Facebook every day so they’re putting an ad module there.

 Facebook’s tips for best practice

Be clear in goals; committed to social long term; create engaging authentic content; enable sharing, drive distribution

 

 

This Week in Social

•February 3, 2012 • Leave a Comment

This Week in Social dishes up some new campaigns from the likes of Schweppes and Heineken and celebrates YouTube reaching 4 billion daily views with some tips of finding new videos on the video site. Enjoy!

Top news of the week

  • Facebook IPO filing reveals a first look at the company’s finances.
  • Twitter is set to roll out enhanced brand pages that will include additional interactivity previously impossible on the microblogging medium.
  • YouTube hits 4 billion daily views- that’s a 25% increase over the last 8 months.
  • Vimeo gets a redesign that places more emphasis on the video and makes it easier and faster to use.

New stuff of the week

For those of you who have been hesitant to try out Facebook’s Timeline, there is a new movie-maker app that creates a customized movie for every Facebook user in an effort to warm them up to Timeline. Timeline Movie Maker requires users to opt in to share personal data including their photos and videos. The app then generates a movie based on a user’s greatest hits, attempting to capture the highlights of a user’s Facebook experience through the years by surfacing pieces of content with high levels of engagement. Now that Timeline is being rolled out across all profiles, this will get people used to the idea in a simple way that taps into the exhibitionist within us all.

Infographic of the week

If any of you underestimated the power of bookmarking site Pinterest, check out this infographic. Pinterest is driving more traffic than Google+, and unique visitors to Pinterest increased 429% from September to December 2011.

Random stuff of the week

Schweppes has launched the Unexpected Future app that predicts how the year would pan out for the user through snippets of posts in the Facebook Timeline format. By analysing your Facebook data, the app reveals your potential achievements with grand predictions in categories such as wealth, career, adventure, romance and fame.

Heineken has launched another fun app in time for Valentine’s Day- The Serenade. The app is designed to help you ask that special someone out on a date this V Day by creating a personalised serenade- just choose who you want a date with, why you chose them, what the plan is and why they should choose you. The personalised serenade will then be posted to their wall, and they can say yes or no to your proposition.

WotWentWrong is a new app that helps you find out, well, what went wrong. Ever wondered why your date never called you back? WONDER NO MORE! WotWentWrong allows rejects to request feedback from their date about why they didn’t like them (seriously) so that they don’t repeat the mistake next time. Sound weird? The demo video is weirder…

Social clusterf#ck of the week


This week, there are two worthy contenders on the social clusterf#ck front. Firstly, a local screw up by Mortein. Mortein’s ‘Louie The Fly – Only you can decide Louie’s fate’ campaign has come under storm this week when Reckitt Benckiser announced that it would be closing its Sydney factory and move manufacturing offshore, cutting close to 200 jobs. People have been pointing the finger and naming the controversial “save or kill Louie” campaign as a PR stunt designed to distract from the company’s plans. Mortein has since axed the Louie campaign in the face of the backlash.

The second contender this week was when two UK tourists were refused entry and turned back from the US after their perfectly innocent tweets sparked suspicion. A week before leaving the UK,Leigh Bryan tweeted to his friend “Free this week for a quick gossip/prep before I go and destroy America? X” and then “3 weeks today, we’re totally in LA pissing people off on Hollywood Blvd and diggin’ Marilyn Monroe up!”. After detaining the duo and searching their luggage for shovels (seriously), officials told the pair that they were not allowed into the country due to the tweets. Read more about it here.

Photo credits: Regretsy;

Thanks to social mover and shaker Madi Arnold for compiling this update.

This week in Social

•January 27, 2012 • 5 Comments

Happy Australia Day! While to some our national day is all about the Hottest 100, Big Day Out or riding inflatable oversized Havianas on our beaches, to the community managers of some of our major media outlets it’s a headache as the public takes to their social networks to share their opinions on sensitive topics. 9 News* and news.com.au both had to do some damage control on their Facebook pages as tensions flared.

Top news of the week Continue reading ‘This week in Social’

Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Google + profile image specs

•January 23, 2012 • 3 Comments

This could be the most frustrating time to set up social media accounts – Twitter is mid changeover to a new look, Facebook’s Timeline is ready to drop for brands any day now, YouTube just had a refresh and Google+ is new on the scene. So if you’re looking for profile image specs or background specs for Twitter, Facebook, YouTube or Google+, here’s your one stop shop!

Facebook

Profile image: 540 x 180            Thumbnail: 200 wide (allow 12 for border)

Profile stream: 97 x 68 (5 images required)

Landing tab image: 800 x 500

UPDATE: The new Timeline cover photo specs have been released by Facebook. 

Cover images must be at least 399 pixels wide and may not contain:

  • Price or purchase information, such as “40% off” or “Download it at our website”
  • Contact information, such as web address, email, mailing address or other information intended for your Page’s About section
  • References to user interface elements, such as Like or Share, or any other Facebook site features
  • Calls to action, such as “Get it now” or “Tell your friends”
DreamGrow.com have put together a great cheat sheet for Timeline [pdf].
Updated: DreamGrow.com have made an even prettier version here

Twitter

Profile image: 128 x 128 (scaled down to 48 x 48 in stream)

Larger than 48k but no more than 700k

Background: 1280 width, 66 – 194 for the left hand side of the background [Twitter fixed width of 865px]

Smaller than 800k, left aligned

Hat tip to Banyan Branch for some of these details

NB: Twitter will be changing from the existing standard profile page layout to a new enhanced layout soon. Artwork will need to be changed then. Confirmed specs for this layout are:

Profile image: 835 x 90 header image

https://business.twitter.com/advertise/enhanced-profile/

YouTube

Channel background: 1500px and 2000px wide, 1200px and 2500px tall

Smaller than 256k

http://support.google.com/youtube/bin/answer.py?hl=en-GB&answer=1735230

Google+

Profile image: 192 x 202

Scrapbook stream: 126 x 126 (5 images required)

The fight against trolls and the bystander effect

•January 19, 2012 • Leave a Comment

Social media isn’t all lolcats and Farmville. On Wednesday a Melbourne teenager posted a suicide note on Tumblr and her followers sprung into action. Using their social media stalking powers for good, several Melbourne and Sydney based tweeps found links to other social accounts and therefore relatives who could help the girl. Names of relatives were identified and contact was made through Facebook and Victorian Police. Radio station 3AW also picked up the cause. The teen was found conscious and taken to hospital. Later that night she updated her Tumblr from hospital with an image of the equipment monitoring her life.

While the Twitter crew were unrelenting in their mission to make her safe, her update highlighted the cruel taunts of online trolls:
Update:
So I’m alive.
I’m in hospital.
The police came to my house and found me.. well,
lets just say it wasn’t a pretty scene.
so yeah, I’m so sorry to the people I worried.
and thankyou to the people telling me to hurry up and kill myself already.
It’s really just what I needed right now.
I’ll keep you updated.
 The guilt and pain was clearly top of mind; as an after-thought she posted again:
Also, thank you so much to everyone who sent me a message.
You have no idea how much it means to me.
I wish I could respond to all of them but there’s 1000+
and I wouldn’t know where to begin.
But seriously, from the bottom of my heart,
thank you. 
The incident highlights a growing concern – as younger generations use social networks as an extension of regular communication, their online relationships can be influenced by a new enemy. Multiple enemies. The troll who provokes and attacks out of a sick desire for conflict. The cyberbully whose taunts are unrelenting and further reaching than a note passed in class or graffiti on a bathroom wall. The overexposed bystander who decides this isn’t their fight, there’s nothing they can do, or that this is just a selfish generation’s exhaustive and empty cry for help.
I am ridiculously proud of friends involved in finding the teen’s family so they could get police to her before it was too late. I’m grateful that the issue came to the attention of those people, and not an apathetic group of bystanders unwilling to recognise or accept the severity of the situation. I am impressed with the duty of care shown by 3AW by not just reporting the story as breaking news and taking the responsibility to remove tweets after hearing of her safety (also encouraging the same for others) to avoid confusion. I am sickened that bullying and apathy have found this common breeding ground that can be even more damaging than ever before and have spent many an hour trying to find the beginnings of an idea that’s going to stop it. I’m a little lost. Despite the fact that there’s still a long road ahead for the teen, yesterday’s outcome – and the fact that she has an opportunity to walk that road – I have hope that it’ll be found and an understanding that it will take a lot of effort.

ROI and social media smackdown

•December 8, 2011 • 1 Comment

There’s been a rather heated debated about ROI and social media from Olivier Blanchard,  David Meerman Scott and Matt Ridings.

I’ve used Storify for the highlights but here’s a few links that might get you inspired to jump into the debate.

The points of view:

Social Media ROI Hypocrisy 

Social Media and Return on Investment: Some clarity

There’s no ROI in Social Media Marketing

Twitter accounts:

Olivier Blanchard

David Meerman Scott

Matt Ridings

So are you Team Blanchard or Team Scott? Is there ROI in social media? How do you explain it to your c-level execs?

I’m Team Blanchard. It’s all down to the type of activity, how it matches your objectives and what you actually do to trigger sales. If people are wondering why their Facey page is yet to earn a sale the first place to check is where and when you’ve told people to go and buy your stuff and how they can do it.  In the crush to become oh-so-social and avoid the hard sell too many companies are avoiding the actual sell. Doesn’t mean it can’t be done.

 
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